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News: Renee Beyer benefit ride September 13 2014
 
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Author Topic: Engine Swap  (Read 3879 times)
PJ1
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« Reply #15 on: June 08, 2010, 04:53:55 AM »

I would say the pins in the chain are the failure point and you have no idea what they look like unless you unload the chain. Your never going to get any closer to it and knowing that they fail would be another reason to just change it and save yourself the headache down the road.
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dirtnerd
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« Reply #16 on: June 10, 2010, 12:49:21 PM »

I guess the tensioners are actually what fail, so there would be some indication of wear from running a loose chain.  But I do agree that its an easy job right now so I think I'll do it.  Once I install the engine I'm not sure if I'll have room to drop the oil pan and remove the timing chain cover.  If this thing starts making noise down the road I'll be kicking myself for not doing the job now.  So I ordered the timing / water pump kit.  $140, including shipping.  New gears, chains, and tensioners. All need to buy are the gaskets and a new crank pulley seal.
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dirtnerd
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« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2010, 02:55:23 AM »

I was trying to EZout a broken bolt that held the oil pan last nite and I totaly f-d that job up. I got all off center and couldn't get the bolt out. I ended up with an offcententered oversized hole, and there was still some of the bolt that remained, so I went in with a chainsaw file and removed what was left.  There is no way a heilicoil will work now.  So I suppose the right way to fix it is to TIG the hole back up and re-drill and tap.  But that seems like a lot of work since I can't do that at my house.  I could also fill the hole with epoxy, drill a new, straight hole and through bolt it with a nut.  My fear with that is I won't be able to access the nut with a wrench once its all put together and sitting in the car.  So my question is, has anyone used any of those aluminum brazing rods?  It looks like there are two major brands: HTS-2000 and Alumaloy.  According to all the info-mmercial like videos on their websites I should be able to fill the hole in with this stuff and then drill and re-tap.  Does anyone know if these brazing rods work?  It only needs to hold threads for a 6mm bolt that holds the oil pan up.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2010, 05:52:12 AM by dirtnerd » Logged
PJ1
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« Reply #18 on: June 15, 2010, 04:51:58 AM »

They work like a bastard just keep your temps under 900deg or its all over.
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tacowillys
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« Reply #19 on: June 16, 2010, 10:17:04 AM »

clean the hole, use a jbweld or devcon that is for the application, fill the hole in and re-drill and tap.  Your more likely to mess up the block trying to tig or braze the aluminum.  If its just one small oil pan bolt the epoxy stuff should hold well to do its job.
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dirtnerd
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« Reply #20 on: June 25, 2010, 02:59:58 AM »

clean the hole, use a jbweld or devcon that is for the application, fill the hole in and re-drill and tap.  Your more likely to mess up the block trying to tig or braze the aluminum.  If its just one small oil pan bolt the epoxy stuff should hold well to do its job.

I used the JB weld and then installed the bolt like a stud.  problem solved.  The new timing chain is on. Now I'm just waiting for some o-rings and gaskets from the dealer and I can finish putting it all together
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